Jess Turner- Definearth

Green Power Garden State.

on the mountain Pic by Jess Turner

This is a fellow blogger who also has a passion for the environment named Jess Turner, a 22 year old environmentalist from New York. She grew up in her grandmother’s 15 acres of woods. She says that her appreciation for the environment was shaped by her life experiences. From being president of her school’s environmental club to spending long days building a brick walkway through the garden. Her passion as a writer has led her to run a blog and a website both titled, definearth.  She even has an interview that is published in Women in Higher Education Magazine titled, Creating Diversity in STEM: An Interview with Dr. Letitia Thomas.

Jess Turner has worked as a research assistant in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Syracuse University with Dr. Charles Driscoll. She studied the efficiencies of solar cookers and did research at University at Buffalo’s Civil, Structural…

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Allequash Creek Wetland

flux tower in field

Despite the fact that wetlands have a relatively colorless appearance and are somewhat of an inhospitable environment for many species, these kinds of ecosystems are clandestinely buzzing with land-atmosphere interactions. Just last month, I explored Allequash Creek Wetland in Northern Wisconsin with the USGS to collect aquatic chemistry and CH4/CO2 measurements and to gain a general sense of the site. The eddy covariance flux tower in the photo above provides the flux data from the wetland which I will be compiling, analyzing, and presenting for my master’s thesis. Continue reading

Interview with Kevin Trenberth

Kevin Trenberth is a research meteorologist and senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado who works largely on analysis of global climate data, climate models and the effects of El Niño. Upon meeting Dr. Trenberth, I found him to be well-spoken with a down-to-earth yet amiable disposition. If you listen closely you can even hear his subtle sense of humor. During his time at UW-Madison he shared insights on modeling, working with others, and a broad overview of energy in the climate system.

 

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Let Me Breathe: Things I Didn’t Know About Indoor Air

cycas revoluta

An article published in the Journal of Physiological Anthropology showed that people felt “comfortable, soothed, and natural” after potting plants and had lower diastolic blood pressure compared to when they carried out computer-related tasks. Not only have plants been linked to an improved mood, but also they are known to improve indoor air quality. Here are some other things that everyone should know about indoor air. Continue reading

Modern Day Deforestation

shot hole disease

Shot hole disease. Pic from tree and ladder blog.

Deforestation is a daunting issue that seems to be a consequence of human existence. Not only are trees harvested for timber and fuel, but also clearing trees allows us to build shelter and create infrastructure that will improve our quality of life. Many people see reforestation as the solution to all environmental problems. Trees are expected to serve humanity while also negating the ugly effects of industrialization. That’s a lot to pressure to place on a single organism. First, let’s explore the reasons why deforestation occurs.

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Nature Walks

botanical garden

Oh, how I miss having a back yard. Living in an apartment complex has limited my ability to do back yard things such as reading a book in a lawn chair, or picnicking without having to take an elevator down ten flights and bike to the nearest park. Some days I explore the bike paths around town to see all the green and brown and blue that surrounds this city. Other days, I prefer the view standing still instead of whizzing by me in a blur of color. I still want a back yard, but the flower garden and nearby lake are passable substitutes. Continue reading

Journey to the Central Sands and Beyond

Standing in the cranberry bog.

Standing in the cranberry bog.

Beautiful vistas clog up my phone memory at the moment. I don’t want them to clutter up this post, so I’m only sharing the best from my orientation trip for grad school. We visited many agricultural sites including a potato farm, cranberry bog, dairy farm and free range cattle operation. We also stopped at Frank’s Hill, Kickapoo Valley Reserve, and other natural environments along the way. Continue reading