Modern Day Deforestation

shot hole disease

Shot hole disease. Pic from tree and ladder blog.

Deforestation is a daunting issue that seems to be a consequence of human existence. Not only are trees harvested for timber and fuel, but also clearing trees allows us to build shelter and create infrastructure that will improve our quality of life. Many people see reforestation as the solution to all environmental problems. Trees are expected to serve humanity while also negating the ugly effects of industrialization. That’s a lot to pressure to place on a single organism. First, let’s explore the reasons why deforestation occurs.

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Nature Walks

botanical garden

Oh, how I miss having a back yard. Living in an apartment complex has limited my ability to do back yard things such as reading a book in a lawn chair, or picnicking without having to take an elevator down ten flights and bike to the nearest park. Some days I explore the bike paths around town to see all the green and brown and blue that surrounds this city. Other days, I prefer the view standing still instead of whizzing by me in a blur of color. I still want a back yard, but the flower garden and nearby lake are passable substitutes. Continue reading

The Connecticut Cat: Pumas in the Eastern United States – Part 2

The time has come for the second post in the collaborative blog series “Pumas in the Eastern United States”. This article was written by Josh Gross from The Jaguar and I encourage you to follow his blog and learn about his work on big cats. Let’s begin.

On June 11, 2011, a car traveling along the Wilbur Cross Parkway in Milford, Connecticut hit an animal that was crossing the road. But this was not a creature that Connecticut motorists were used to encountering: it was a puma (AKA mountain lion, cougar, or Puma concolor). Continue reading

Eco Blogger Award

painting of ferns

Communicating science to the public is a delicate art. Eco Blogger Award commends bloggers who explore environmental topics in their writing, encompassing anything from gardening to wildlife conservation to hiking or even research. Once you are nominated for the award, you can choose to continue the tradition by thanking the person who nominated you, answering the following questions, and nominating 6 other blogs for the award. Here are the questions: Continue reading

Environmental Film Review: “The 100”

The 100 is a science fiction and teen romance mashup series on Netflix that follows a similar plot to LOST and Eureka. A group of teenage delinquents find themselves banished to a post-apocalyptic Earth when their spaceship starts experiencing technical failures. To make matters worse, their parents arrive on the planet shortly after ready to take the reigns and enforce new rules because politics and more infrastructural issues finally made the spaceship unlivable.

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Image from The 100 on Netflix.

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Nature Tattoos

Something you can’t see in my LinkedIn profile picture is my enormous lion tattoo. Or my peace sign tattoo. Or my yin yang, or my sand dollar, or my sun, or my tweety bird. Each one has a special meaning to me, but above all they are signs of my passion for all things nature. In this post I will be taking a break from my science-heavy articles to entertain you with some super cool inks from my friends.

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Sustainable Cities

black and white bikes

There’s a better chance at winning the lottery than finding a bike spot in Madison.

Whether or not bicyclists obey the bike light installed on the bike path near my apartment is up for debate. What’s important is that it’s there. As a new resident of a bustling city, I got to thinking what makes one place more sustainable than another. Determining factors of a sustainable city will vary depending on who you ask. If you ask me, an eco-friendly city needs these things: Continue reading