Modern Day Deforestation

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Shot hole disease. Pic from tree and ladder blog.

Deforestation is a daunting issue that seems to be a consequence of human existence. Not only are trees harvested for timber and fuel, but also clearing trees allows us to build shelter and create infrastructure that will improve our quality of life. Many people see reforestation as the solution to all environmental problems. Trees are expected to serve humanity while also negating the ugly effects of industrialization. That’s a lot to pressure to place on a single organism. First, let’s explore the reasons why deforestation occurs.

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Journey to the Central Sands and Beyond

Standing in the cranberry bog.

Standing in the cranberry bog.

Beautiful vistas clog up my phone memory at the moment. I don’t want them to clutter up this post, so I’m only sharing the best from my orientation trip for grad school. We visited many agricultural sites including a potato farm, cranberry bog, dairy farm and free range cattle operation. We also stopped at Frank’s Hill, Kickapoo Valley Reserve, and other natural environments along the way. Continue reading

Zero Waste Q&A

Laura Markley is a PhD student in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Syracuse University. Previously, she attended Eastern Connecticut State University for her BS and Lehigh University for her MS in Environmental Earth Science. Her blog focuses on her waste-free living lifestyle. On it, you can find anything from healthy recipes to tips on recycling and even research articles. The following is a Q&A with Laura about her decision to go zero-waste.

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Laura Markley. Photo from Waste-Free PhD.

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Environmental Film Review: “The 100”

The 100 is a science fiction and teen romance mashup series on Netflix that follows a similar plot to LOST and Eureka. A group of teenage delinquents find themselves banished to a post-apocalyptic Earth when their spaceship starts experiencing technical failures. To make matters worse, their parents arrive on the planet shortly after ready to take the reigns and enforce new rules because politics and more infrastructural issues finally made the spaceship unlivable.

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Image from The 100 on Netflix.

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Sustainability Month

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My zero-emission mode of transport for the week.

I hope everyone was able to get outside this past Sunday to celebrate the holiday. Remember, environmental awareness doesn’t have to end with Earth Day! Keep the environmental vibes alive into the month of April, the Sustainability Month.  Continue reading

The Garbage Patch

After studying the environment at university for four years, I have written over 60 blog posts on environmental issues, formulated a personal memoir on my life as an environmentalist, and maintained a semi-annual environmental news page. Nevertheless, I still haven’t done everything in my power to end environmental issues.

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Graphic from Clean Water Action.

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Hello, Madison!

Map of Wisconsin from Google Earth.

The pain of waiting for an answer is over: I’ve been accepted to the University of Wisconsin-Madison to study Land Resources. The bustling capital city is located between two frequently-kayaked and very fishable lakes, Monona and Mendota. The city is sustainable in that biking and walking are the main methods of transportation, and places to eat, live, study, and be entertained are all very close to each other. A highly centralized city like Madison is a great environment for a grad student without a car, such as myself. The average apartment here rents for around $800/month but according to students, the price of living is increasing as people are discovering this secret city. Here are some pictures from the plane, a map of Wisconsin, and the view of the “West Side” from the top of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS) building at the University. Continue reading